Current Faculty

Contact Information Position Area
Karlos Arregi
(773) 702-8528

Rosenwald 205A
Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Linguistics and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Arregi's interests include syntax, syntax-semantics, syntax-phonology interfaces, and morphology. He also specializes in Basque and Romance Linguistics.
Diane Brentari
(773) 702-5725

Rosenwald 205D
Mary K. Werkman Professor, Department of Linguistics, and Humanities Collegiate Division My research primarily focuses on the sign languages of the Deaf communities of the world -- their similarities and differences with each other and with regard to spoken languages. These questions extend to the emergence of sign languages, and to the complex role that gesture plays in all languages, both spoken and signed.
Amy Dahlstrom
(773) 834-9910

Rosenwald 224B
Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Linguistics and Humanities Collegiate Division. Amy Dahlstrom’s research is on the indigenous languages of the Americas, especially the Algonquian languages Meskwaki (Fox) and Cree, examining issues of morphology, syntax, and information structure. The framework she uses in her syntactic and morphosyntactic work is Lexical Functional Grammar.
Itamar Francez
(773) 834-2366

Rosenwald 229D
Assistant Professor, Department of Linguistics, and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Francez works on formal and lexical semantics as well as the syntax-semantics interface and philosophy of language.
Susan Gal
(773) 702-2551

Haskell 237
Mae & Sidney G. Metzl Distinguished Service Professor Departments of Anthropology, Linguistics, and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Gal's specializations are in the role of language in culture and society, in gender theory, and in language issues in Eastern Europe.
Anastasia Giannakidou
(773) 834-9819

Rosenwald 201A
Professor. Department of Linguistics, and Humanities Collegiate Division. Dr. Giannakidou works on formal semantics, syntax, pragmatics, and their interfaces, with emphasis on variation in meaning and form across and within languages. She studies Greek, Germanic, and Romance languages, and has also been involved in studies of Chinese, Basque, and Korean. Currently, she studies the linguistic properties of home sign systems with colleagues in the Psychology department, and is interested in the properties of bilingual language acquisition and education.
John Goldsmith
(773) 702-3681

Rosenwald 201B
Edward Carson Waller Distinguished Service Professor. Departments of Linguistics, Computer Science and Physical Science Collegiate Division, and Humanities Collegiate Division. Dr. Goldsmith is concerned with computational linguistics, phonological theory, Bantu languages, ASL, and French.
Yaroslav Gorbachov
(773) 702-6897

Rosenwald 229C
Assistant Professor, Department of Linguistics, and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Gorbachov studies Historical Slavic, Baltic, and Indo-European linguistics (in particular, verb morphology), as well as Balto-Slavic accentology.
Lenore A. Grenoble
(773) 702-0927

Rosenwald 214
John Matthews Manly Distinguished Service Professor and Chair, Department of Linguistics and Humanities Collegiate Division; Acting Director of Graduate Studies for Slavic Linguistics, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures Lenore Grenoble specializes in Slavic and Arctic Indigenous languages, and is currently conducting fieldwork on Evenki (Tungusic) in Siberia, Kalaallisut (West Greenlandic, Inuit) in Greenland, and Wolof (Niger-Congo) in Senegal. Her research focuses on the study of contact linguistics and language shift, discourse and conversation analysis, deixis, and issues in the study of language endangerment, attrition, and revitalization.
Chris Kennedy
(773) 834-1988

Rosenwald 205E
William H. Colvin Professor, Department of Linguistics and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Kennedy's research addresses topics in semantics and pragmatics, the syntax-semantics interface, and philosophy of language, and engages methodologically and theoretically with work in other areas of cognitive science.
Greg Kobele
(773) 834-4607

Rosenwald 229B
Neubauer Family Assistant Professor. Computation Institute, Department of Linguistics, and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Kobele works on syntax and semantics, in particular from a computational and mathematical perspective.
Jason Merchant
(773) 702-8523

Rosenwald 205C
Lorna Puttkammer Straus Professor, Department of Linguistics and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Merchant works in syntax, semantics, morphology, and their interfaces, with particular emphases on Germanic languages and Greek.
Salikoko S. Mufwene
(773) 702-8531

Wieboldt 411
Frank J. McLoraine Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Linguistics and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Mufwene studies language evolution, with special attention to creole language varieties, African-American English, and colonial Englishes. He has also worked on semantics, lexicography, pragmatics, and Bantu morphosyntax.
Jason Riggle
(773) 702-8528

Rosenwald 229A
Associate Professor, Director of Language Modeling Lab, Department of Linguistcs and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Riggle works in phonology, morphology, and computational linguistics.
Michael Silverstein
(773) 702-7713

Haskell Hall 313
Charles F. Grey Distinguished Service Professor. Departments: Anthropology, Linguistics, Psychology, and the Humanities Collegiate Division, and Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities Dr. Silverstein works on American Indian languages, Australian languages, cultural semiotics, and cognition.
Ming Xiang
(773) 702-8023

Rosenwald 205B
Assistant Professor. Department of Linguistics, and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Xiang works in sentence processing and experimental syntax and semantics.
Alan C. L. Yu
(773) 702-8522

Rosenwald 205F
Professor, Department of Linguistics and Humanities Collegiate Division Dr. Yu works on phonological theory, language variation and change, morphology, phonetics, psycholinguistics, Native American languages and Cantonese.