Colloquia 2008-2009

Fall

October 23: Paul Portner, Georgetown University,
Two Problems about Permission

October 30: Diane Brentari, Purdue University, 
When does a system become phonological? Grammatical regularities at the interfaces.

November 4: Matthias Brenzinger, University of Cologne,
Changing roles for African languages in the past, present, and future
This colloquium will take place on a special date, time and place:
4-5:30pm, Harper 103

November 13: Duane Watson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
Prosody, Production, and Parsing

November 20: Luis López Carretero, University of Illinois at Chicago,
A thing or two that I learned studying dislocations

December 4: Alicia Wassink, University of Washington,
The Development of Sociolinguistic Competence in Children

Winter

January 15: Tania Ionin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
The scope of English indefinites: an experimental investigation

January 20 (Tuesday): Greg Kobele, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin,
On Syntactic Copying
Room change: Rosenwald 11

January 29: Tim Hunter, University of Maryland, College Park
Procedures for Computing in Syntax and Semantics

March 5: Keren Rice, University of Toronto 
What determines morpheme order in the Athapaskan verb?

Spring

April 2: Adam Albright, MIT
Rabbitometry vs. rabbitography: phonetic faithfulness and affix-by-affix differences in derived words

April 30: Teresa Satterfield, University of Michigan
Testing Language Formation Theories: Computer experiments as linguistic time machines

May 14: Nick Fleisher, Wayne State University (Cancelled)
Attributive Adjectives and the Semantics of Inappropriateness

May 21: Ryan Shosted, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Still breathing? The state of aerodynamics in phonetics and phonology

June 1: Shigeto Kawahara, Rutgers University
Testing P-map
Note: Monday colloquium, to be held in Harper 103 from 3:30 to 5pm.

June 4: Rob Podesva, Georgetown University
The social meaning of released /t/ among U.S. politicians: Insights from production and perception