Victor A. Friedman

Professor Emeritus, Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Linguistics and Humanities Collegiate Division

Victor A. Friedman is Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the Humanities at the University of Chicago. He is president of the U.S. National Committee of the International Association for Southeast European Studies. He is a member of the Macedonian Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Academy of Sciences of Albania, the Academy of Arts and Sciences of Kosova, Matica Srpska, and has been awarded the "1300 Years of Bulgaria" jubilee medal. He has thrice been awarded the Golden Plaque from Sts. Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, from which he also holds the degree of Doctor Honoris Causa. He received the Outstanding Contributions to Scholarship Award from American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages in 2009 and the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Scholarship of the Association for East European Eurasian and Slavic Studies in 2014. His research has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Social Science Research Council, etc.  During the Yugoslav Wars of Succession he worked for the United Nations as a senior policy analyst in Macedonia and consulted for other international organizations. His publications include more than a dozen books and edited works, as well as more than 300 scholarly articles and book reviews. In addition to his research on the Balkan languages, he has published extensively on Lak and Georgian. He has done field work in Daghestan in addition to more than 40 years of field work in the Balkans. His main research interests are grammatical categories, contact linguistics, and sociolinguistic issues related to standardization, ideology, and identity. His current projects include The Balkan Languages (Cambridge U.P., with Brian Joseph), The Slavonic Languages 2nd. edition (edited with Lenore Grenoble, Routledge), Lak (The Oxford Handbook of Languages of the Caucasus, ed. by Masha Polinsky), Overiview; and The Balkans for Sprachbund and Linguistic Areas (The Cambridge Handbook of Language Contact ed. by Salikoko Mufwene and Anna María Escobar), and The Impact of Turkish on Romani (Handbook of Romani Linguistics, ed. by Yaron Matras and Anton Tenser, Palgrave Macmillan). 

Recent Publications 
  • Od Čikago i nazad: Papers to Honor Victor A. Friedman on the Occasion of his Retirement (= Balkanistica 28). Ed. by Donald L. Dyer, Brian D. Joseph, and Christina E. Kramer. University (Oxford), Mississippi: Balkanistica. xlvi+596 pp. 2015.
  • The Albanian Gerund from a Balknological Perspective. Edhe 100: Studi in onore del Prof. Francesco Altimari in occasione del 60˚ compleano, ed. by Bardhyl Demiraj, Matteo Mandalà, Shaban Sinani, 199-201. Tirana: Albpaper. 2015.
  • Makedonistički Studii II [Macedonian: Macedonian Studies II]. Skopje: Macedonian Academy of Arts and Sciences. 360 pp. 2015.
  • Romani Worlds: Media, Academia, and Policy. edited w/ Eben Friedman, Cluj-Napoca: Editura Institutului pentru Studierea Problemelor Minorităților Naționale. 2015. 368 pp.
  • Grammatical Categories of the Macedonian Indicative. Columbus. Slavica, 2nd Revised Edition. xviii+189 pp. 2014.
  • Lessons from Judezmo about the Balkan Sprachbund and Contact Linguistics. (with Brian D. Joseph) International Journal of the Sociology of Language 226.3-23. 2014.
  • The Languages of the Balkans. Oxford Bibliographies Online: Linguistics, ed. Mark Aronoff. Oxford Bibliographies On Line <http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199772810/obo-9780199772810-0108.xml> 2013.
  • The Morphology of Imperatives in Lak: Stem Vowels in the Second Singular Simplex Transitive Affirmative. Language Typology and Historical Contingency. ed. by Balthasar Bickel, Lenore Grenoble, David Peterson, Alan Timberlake, 445-462. Amsterdam: Benjamins. 2013.
  • Perhaps Mirativity is Phlogiston, but Admirativity is Perfect: On Balkan Evidential Strategies. Linguistic Typology Vol. 16, No. 3. 505-527. 2012.
  • Compartmentalized Grammar: The Variable (Non)-Integration of Turkish Verbal Conjugation in Romani Dialects. Romani Studies. 5, 23.107-120. 2013.
  • Enhancing National Solidarity through the Deployment of Verbal Categories: How the Albanian Admirative Participates in the Construction of a Reliable Self and an Unreliable Other. Pragmatics and Society. Vol. 3, issue 2, 189-225. 2012. [republished in Evidentiality in Interaction, ed. by Janis Nuckolls and Lev Michael, 21-56. Benjamins Current Topics 63, Amsterdam: Benjamins. 2014.]
  • Copying and Cognates in the Balkan Sprachbund. Copies vs Cognates in Bound Morphology, ed. by Lars Johanson and  Martine Robeets, 323-336. Leiden: Brill. 2012.
  • Tense-Aspect and Language Contact. The Oxford Handbook of Tense and Aspect, ed. Robert Binnick, 398-427.  Oxford: Oxford. 2012.
  • Očerki lakskogo jazyka [Russian: Studies on the Lak language]. Maxachkala: Russian Academy of Arts and Sciences. 168 pp. 2011.
  • Makedonistički Studii [Macedonian: Macedonian Studies]. Skopje: Macedonian Academy of Arts and Sciences. 236 pp. 2011
  • The Balkan Languages and Balkan Linguistics. Ann. Rev. of Anthro., Vol. 40. 2011. 275-291.
  • Families, Leagues, and Hybridity: The Past and Future of Slavic and East European Languages. Distinguished Professor Lecture, AATSEEL Keynote Address. Slavic and East European Journal. Vol 55(1).1–13. 2011.
  • Conjunctivity and Contact: A Contribution from Aromanian, Hommage Nicolae Saramandu. ed. by Manuela Nevaci. Bucharest: University of Bucharest. 2011.
  • When is a Present not Present?—Turkish İmiş, Kazakh Eken, and the Albanian Admirative. Trans-Turkic Studies: Festschrift in Honor of Marcel Erdal, ed. by M. Kappler, M. Kirchner and P. Zieme. Istanbul: TDAD. 2010. 435-440.
Education 
  • BA in Russian, Reed College, 1970
  • MA in Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Chicago, 1971
  • PhD in Linguistics and in Slavic Languages and Literatures (first dual degree in the Humanities Division), University of Chicago, 1975