Courses

22450 Language, Gender, and Sexuality

This course focuses on the relationship, in theory and in practice, between language, gender, and sexuality. We begin with a brief overview of the field and some of its major theoretical developments. Then we expand on themes of desire and identity; binaries and normativities; embodiment; “interstices”; and performativity. The practical component of the course includes critical analysis of language used to construct gender and sexuality (e.g. in drag shows, communities you belong to personally, social media, and current events). We also consider binary language reform, abolition of linguistic gender systems, and emergence of identity categories as practices of everyday relationality that contest hegemonic systems. Readings are interdisciplinary and draw from fields including Linguistics, Anthropology, Performance Studies, Literary Studies, and Queer Studies.

LING 26030 American Deaf Community: Language, Culture, and Society

This course will focus on the Deaf community that uses American Sign Language (ASL) as a lens into the disciplines of linguistics, psychology, and cultural studies, and how the use of ASL contributes to individual identity and identity within society. In addition to these disciplinary foci, topics of Deaf literature and art forms will figure in the discussion and readings, which come from a variety of sources and include seminal works in the field from historical and contemporary perspectives.

 

TTH, 2:00-3:20

2022-23 Autumn

LING 27010 Psycholinguistics

This is an advanced introduction to the field of psycholinguistics. We will do an in-depth overview of both the empirical findings and the methodologies used on various topics in language comprehension/production, including areas of speech perception, lexical processing, syntactic parsing, and semantic/pragmatic processing. Models at both the computational and the mechanistic levels will also be examined.

 

TTH, 12:30-1:50

2022-23 Autumn

LING 29700 Reading and Research Course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

2022-23 Autumn

LING 20001 Introduction to Linguistics

This course offers a brief survey of how linguists analyze the structure and the use of language. Looking at the structure of language means understanding what phonemes, words, and sentences are, and how each language establishes principles for the combinations of these things and for their use; looking at the use of language means understanding the ways in which individuals and groups use language to declare their social identity and the ways in which languages can change over time. The overarching theme is understanding what varieties of language structure and use are found across the world's languages and cultures, and what limitations on this variety exist.

TTH, 3:30-4:50

2022-23 Autumn

LING 20201 Introduction to Syntax

This course is an introduction to basic goals and methods of current syntactic theory through a detailed analysis of a range of phenomena, with emphasis on argumentation and empirical justification. Major topics include phrase structure and constituency, selection and subcategorization, argument structure, case, voice, expletives, and raising and control structures.

 

MW, 1:30-2:50

2022-23 Autumn

LING 20301 Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics

This course familiarizes students with what it means to study meaning and use in natural language. By “meaning” we refer to the (for the most part, logical) content of words, constituents, and sentences (semantics), and by “use” we intend to capture how this content is implemented in discourse and what kinds of additional dimensions of meaning may then arise (pragmatics). Some of the core empirical phenomena that have to do with meaning are introduced: lexical (i.e., word) meaning, reference, quantification, logical inferencing, presupposition, implicature, context sensitivity, cross-linguistic variation, speech acts. Main course goals are not only to familiarize students with the basic topics in semantics and pragmatics but also to help them develop basic skills in semantic analysis and argumentation.

2022-23 Autumn

MOGK 20100 Intermediate Modern Greek II

This course expands on the material presented in MOGK 20100, enabling students to speak about topics related to employment, current events and issues of public and community interest.

 

MWF, 1:30-2:20

Prerequisites

MOGK 20100 or placement

2022-23 Autumn

MOGK 20100 Intermediate Modern Greek II

This course expands on the material presented in MOGK 20100, enabling students to speak about topics related to employment, current events and issues of public and community interest.

Prerequisites

MOGK 20100 or placement

2022-23 Autumn

10100/30100 American Sign Language I

American Sign Language is the language of the deaf in the United States and much of Canada. It is a full-fledged autonomous language, unrelated to English or other spoken languages. This introductory course teaches the student basic vocabulary and grammatical structure, as well as aspects of deaf culture.

 

MWF, 9:30 – 10:20 am, 10:30 – 11:20 am

2022-23 Autumn

ASLG 10400/ASLG 30400 Intermediate American Sign Language I

This course continues to increase grammatical structure, receptive and expressive skills, conversational skills, basic linguistic convergence, and knowledge of idioms. Field trip required

 

MWF, 11:30-12:20

2022-23 Autumn

LING 30201 Syntactic Analysis I

This course is an advanced survey of topics in graduate syntax examining current syntactic theory through detailed analysis of a range of phenomena and readings from the primary research literature.

 

MW, 3:00-4:20

Prerequisites

Graduate student standing. Undergraduates with a grade of A or A- in Intro to Syntax may petition the instructor for admission

2022-23 Autumn

LING 30401 Psycholinguistics: Language Processing

Crosslistings
PSYC 30401

This is an advanced introduction to the field of psycholinguistics. We will do an in-depth overview of both the empirical findings and the methodologies used on various topics in language comprehension/production, including areas of speech perception, lexical processing, syntactic parsing, and semantic/pragmatic processing. Models at both the computational and the mechanistic levels will also be examined.

 

MW, 1:30-2:50

2022-23 Autumn

LING 23360/LING 33360 Methods in Gesture and Sign Language Research

Crosslistings
CHDV 23360, CHDV 33360, LING 23360, LING 33360, PSYC 33360

In this course we will explore methods of research used in the disciplines of linguistics and psychology to investigate sign language and gesture. We will choose a set of canonical topics from the gesture and sign literature such as pointing, use of the body in quotation, and the use of non-manuals, in order to understand the value of various effective methods in current use and the types of research questions they are best equipped to handle.

 

M, 1:30-4:20

2022-23 Autumn

LING 26520/LING 36520 Mind, Brain and Meaning

Crosslistings
LING 36520, PHIL 26520, PHIL 36520, PSYC 26520, PSYC 36520, COGS 20001

What is the relationship between physical processes in the brain and body and the processes of thought and consciousness that constitute our mental life? Philosophers and others have puzzled over this question for millenia. Many have concluded it to be intractable. In recent decades, the field of cognitive science--encompassing philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, computer science, linguistics and other disciplines--has proposed a new form of answer. The driving idea is that the interaction of the mental and the physical may be understood via a third level of analysis: that of the computational. This course offers a critical introduction to the elements of this approach, and surveys some of the alternatives models and theories that fall within it. Readings are drawn from a range of historical and contemporary sources in philosophy, psychology, linguistics and computer science. (B) (II)

 

TTH, 9:30-10:50

Chris Kennedy, Bridges, Jason; Kay, Leslie
2022-23 Autumn

LING 26810/LING 36810 Bilingualism and Heritage Languages

TTH, 5:00 – 6:30

Anastasia Giannakidou, Zoe Gavriilidou
2022-23 Autumn

LING 40310 Experimental Methods

This course will cover the basic methods for experimental studies, including experimental design, data collection and statistical analysis. To demonstrate different design and analysis tools, we will look at data set from different types of studies, including self-paced reading, acceptability judgment, eye tracking, ERP, etc. Students will also gain hands-on experience on different paradigms.

 

TH, 2:00-3:20

2022-23 Autumn

LING 48000 Pedagogy Workshop

TH, 3:30-4:50

2022-23 Autumn

LING 60000 Reading and Research: LING

This course is an independent study under the guidance of a faculty advisor, indicated by the section number. Please consult with the faculty member in question before enrolling.

Staff
2022-23 Autumn

LING 31000 Morphology

This course is an advanced survey of topics in morphology examining current morphological theory through detailed analysis of a range of phenomena and readings from the primary research literature. The topics covered include blocking, inflectional features, syncretism, allomorphy and suppletion, and morpheme order.

 

MW, 3:00-4:20

2022-23 Autumn

LING 24650/LING 34650 African American English

TTH, 2:00-3:20

2022-23 Autumn

LING 46000 Seminar: Syntax

Undergraduates who have taken both may petition the instructor for admission. This course is an advanced graduate seminar in syntax. Through readings from the primary research literature, we will investigate the nature, properties, and precise formulation of some of the elementary (and perhaps some not-so-elementary) operations that build the syntactic structures of human language.

 

M, 2:30-5:20

 

2022-23 Autumn

LING 47900 Research Seminar

The course aims to guide students on their research in a structured way and to present professionalization information crucial to success in the field. The course is organized largely around working on the research paper, with the goal of making it a conference-presentable and journal-publishable work. Topics covered include abstracts, publishing, handouts, presentation skills, course design, creating and maintaining a CV, cover letters, webpages, and in general everything that is required for you to successfully compete for jobs in linguistics.

 

W, 1:30-3:20

2022-23 Autumn

MOGK 10100/MOGK 30100 Elementary Modern Greek I

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize the students with the Greek alphabet, Modern Greek pronunciation rules and the basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on reading and conversational skills. The students will be able to communicate minimally with formulaic and rote utterances and produce words, phrases and lists.

 

MWF, 3:30-4:20

2022-23 Autumn

SWAH 25200/SWAH 35200 Swahili I

Swahili is the most popular language of Sub-Saharan Africa, spoken in most countries of Eastern and Central Africa by more than 50 million people.  Swahili is characterized by the typical complex Bantu structure.  However, it is particularly easy to pronounce and fast learned.

The Elementary Swahili series is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Swahili and a basic understanding of its structures. The course presents basic phonological, grammatical, and syntactic patterns of Kiswahili. Through a variety of exercises, students develop communicative functionality in listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Emphasis is put on dialogues and role-plays, individual and group presentations, and the use of audiovisual and web-based resources.  Swahili culture and African culture in general are an important component of the course.

At the end of the elementary course series, the students are able to communicate efficiently in everyday life situations, write and present short descriptive notes about elementary pieces of verbal creation (documentaries and video series in Swahili)

 

TTH, 11:00-12:20

2022-23 Autumn

SWAH 26800/SWAH 36800 Intermediate Swahili I

Students focus on broadening their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in this course.

 

TTH, 2:00-3:20

Prerequisites

SWAH 25400 or consent of instructor

2022-23 Autumn

20001 Introduction to Linguistics

This course offers a brief survey of how linguists analyze the structure and the use of language. Looking at the structure of language means understanding what phonemes, words, and sentences are, and how each language establishes principles for the combinations of these things and for their use; looking at the use of language means understanding the ways in which individuals and groups use language to declare their social identities and the ways in which languages can change over time. The overarching theme is understanding what varieties of language structure and use are found across the world's languages and cultures, and what limitations on this variety exist.

TTH 11:00 am – 12:20 pm

2022-23 Winter

20200 Intermediate Modern Greek II

This course expands on the material presented in MOGK 20100, enabling students to speak about topics related to employment, current events and issues of public and community interest.

MWF 1:30 – 2:20 pm

Prerequisites

MOGK 20100 or placement.

2022-23 Winter

21000 Morphology

Why is the plural of child in English children and not *childs? Why is undoable ambiguous ((i) 'unable to be done', (ii) 'able to be undone'), while unkillable isn't (only 'unable to be killed')? Unhappier is intuitively composed of several, smaller pieces: un-, happy, and -er; but what about unkempt? These questions are the purview of MORPHOLOGY, the field of linguistics devoted to studying the internal structure of words and how they are formed. Consequently, in this course we will investigate the nature of morphemes, in all their cross-linguistic shapes and guises. Key concepts which will frame our discussion include inflection, syncretism, allomorphy, and blocking. The only prerequisite for this course is LING 20001: Introduction to Linguistics.

TTH 9:30 – 10:50 am

Prerequisites

LING 20001: Introduction to Linguistics

2022-23 Winter

23920 Language of Deception and Humor

Crosslistings
SIGN 26030

In this course we will examine the language of deception and humor from a variety of perspectives: historical, developmental, neurological, and cross-cultural, and in a variety of contexts: fiction, advertising, politics, courtship, and everyday conversation. We will focus on the (linguistic) knowledge and skills that underlie the use of humor and deception and on what sorts of things they are used to communicate.

MW 1:30 – 2:50 pm

2022-23 Winter

29400 Structure of Potawatomi

TTH 3:30 – 4:50 pm

This introductory course aims to foster an appreciation for the Potawatomi
(Bodw ́ewadmimwen) language, history, and culture as understood through a
linguistic and culturally relevant mode. We will become familiar with the rich
structures of the language through exposure to traditional stories (yadsokanen)
and personal narratives (yathmownen). This will be achieved through an engag-
ing mix of readings, linguistic analyses, classroom discussion, and instruction.
In particular, course texts focus on the histories of displacement, sovereignty,
and governmental relations as well as the use of humor to cope with tragedy
and a shifting cultural identity.


Potawatomi, or Bodw ́ewadmik, are one of the original inhabitants of the land
on which the University of Chicago occupies, and we (the exclusive we, unless
students in the class are also Potawatomi) now have tribal governmental centers
and reservations in Kansas, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Indiana, and Michigan as a
result of Indian removal. As an Algonquian language, Potawatomi is under-
studied and endangered, but this course offers students the ability to familiarize
themselves with the language of this land. Students will not be fluent following
this course, but will possess a newfound appreciation for the diversity of lin-
guistic expression and this community of the Great Lakes region. By the end of
this course, students will understand the foundations of Potawatomi phonology,
morphosyntax, pragmatics, and discourse and will be prepared to develop new
analyses of Potawatomi. This course fulfills the non-Indo-European language re-
quirement for linguistics majors. No previous courses in linguistics are required
though the introductory course is recommended

2022-23 Winter

29700 Reading and Research

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor and linguistics undergraduate adviser.

Staff
2022-23 Winter

29403 Languages of the Iberian Peninsula: Syntax and Context

The Iberian Peninsula is host to a number of languages. These include not only Spanish and European Portuguese, the dominant languages in Spain and Portugal, respectively, but also minoritized languages such as Galician, Basque, Catalan, and others. This class will investigate the morphosyntax of minoritized Iberian languages, drawing comparisons with the dominant languages in the area (Spanish, Portuguese, and French), which have exerted enormous influence on the minoritized languages due to centuries of contact. The focus will be the morphosyntax of these languages, but we also aim to better understand the complex social, historical, and political forces that have shaped them, as well as the way they continue to be affected by these forces and their long and sometimes fraught relationship with the dominant languages.

2022-23 Winter

20050/30050 ASL Lit & Storytelling

This course develops advanced American Sign Language skills through the study of ASL Literature and Storytelling. Using several different genres of video-based ASL texts, we will study native signers use of stories in the Deaf American community. We will work towards comprehending, discussing, analyzing, and producing ASL stories. A high-intermediate to advanced knowledge of ASL is required.

TTH 11:00 am – 12:20 pm

Prerequisites

Complete ASLG 10300 or consent of instructor.

2022-23 Winter

30101 Phonological Analysis I

This course introduces cross-linguistic phonological phenomena and methods of analysis through an indepth examination of fundamental notions that transcend differences between theoretical approaches: contrast, neutralization, natural classes, distinctive features, and basic non-linear phonological processes (e.g., assimilation, harmony, dissimilation).

TTH 2:00 – 3:20 pm

2022-23 Winter

10200/30200 American Sign Language II

American Sign Language is the language of the deaf in the United States and much of Canada. It is a full-fledged autonomous language, unrelated to English or other spoken languages. This introductory course teaches the student basic vocabulary and grammatical structure, as well as aspects of deaf culture.

MWF 9:30 – 10:20 am, 10:30 – 11:20 am

Prerequisites

ASLG 10100

2022-23 Winter

10200/30200 Elementary Modern Greek II

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands the material presented in MOGK 10100/30100.

MWF 3:30 – 4:20 pm

Prerequisites

MOGK 10100/30100 or consent of instructor.

2022-23 Winter

10500/30500 Intermediate American Sign Language II

This course continues to increase grammatical structure, receptive and expressive skills, conversational skills, basic linguistic convergence, and knowledge of idioms. Field trip required.

MWF 11:30 am – 12:20 pm

Prerequisites

ASLG 10400.

2022-23 Winter

21300/31300 Historical Linguistics

Crosslistings
ANTH 47300

This course deals with the issue of variation and change in language. Topics include types, rates, and explanations of change; the differentiation of dialects and languages over time; determination and classification of historical relationships among languages, and reconstruction of ancestral stages; parallels with cultural and genetic evolutionary theory; and implications for the description and explanation of language in general.

TTH 3:30 – 4:50 pm

Prerequisites

Intro to Linguistics and Intro to Phonetics and Phonology or Graduate student status.

2022-23 Winter

25300/35300 Swahili II

Swahili is the most popular language of Sub-Saharan Africa, spoken in most countries of Eastern and Central Africa by more than 50 million people. Swahili is characterized by the typical complex Bantu structure. However, it is particularly easy to pronounce and fast learned.

The Elementary Swahili series is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Swahili and a basic understanding of its structures. The course presents basic phonological, grammatical, and syntactic patterns of Kiswahili.

Through a variety of exercises, students develop communicative functionality in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis is put on dialogues and role-plays, individual and group presentations, and the use of audiovisual and web-based resources. Swahili culture and African culture in general are an important component of the course.

At the end of the elementary course series, the students are able to communicate efficiently in everyday life situations, write and present short descriptive notes about elementary pieces of verbal creation (documentaries and video series in Swahili). This course allows fulfilling the non-Indo-European language requirement.

TTH 11:00 am – 12:20 pm

 

Prerequisites

SWAH 25200 or consent of instructor.

2022-23 Winter

28355/38355 A Linguistic Introduction to Swahili I

Spoken in ten countries of Eastern and Central Africa, Swahili has more speakers than any other language in the Bantu family, a group of more than 400 languages most prevalent in sub-equatorial Africa. Based on Swahili Grammar and Workbook, this course helps the students master key areas of the Swahili language in a fast yet enjoyable pace. Topics include sound and intonation patterns, noun class agreements, verb moods, and sentence structures. Additionally, this course provides important listening and expressive reading skills. For advanced students, historical interpretations are offered for exceptional patterns observed in Swahili, in relation with other Bantu languages. This is a general introduction course with no specific prerequisites.

2022-23 Winter

28620/38620 Computational Linguistics

Crosslistings
CMSC 35620

This course is a graduate-level introduction to topics at the intersection of computation and language. We will study computational linguistics from both scientific and engineering angles: the use of computational modeling to address scientific questions in linguistics and cognitive science, as well as the design of computational systems to solve engineering problems in natural language processing (NLP). The course will combine analysis and discussion of these approaches with training in the programming and mathematical foundations necessary to put these methods into practice. The course is designed to accommodate students both with and without prior programming experience. Our goal is for all students to leave the course able to engage with and critically evaluate research in cognitive/linguistic modeling and NLP, and to be able to implement intermediate-level computational models for novel computational linguistics research.

TTH 11:00 am – 12:20 pm

Prerequisites

Computational Linguistics I or permission of instructor.

2022-23 Winter

29402/39402 Language Contact: Greek and the World's Languages

How do languages get into contact? How long do they stay in contact? What is contact-induced language change, and which are the mechanisms that govern it? What do arachnophobia, myalgia, geology, heterophagy mean?
In this course we will study language contact and its outcomes, as well as the social and linguistic factors that regulate contact-induced changes. We will examine a wide range of language contact phenomena from both general linguistic and sociolinguistic perspectives, and survey current approaches to all of the major types of contact-induced change (e.g. borrowing). Having Greek (but also other languages) as an example, we will consider linguistic and social aspects of the contact context as well as look into how the particular language has shaped the savant vocabulary of science, philosophy, arts, etc.


More precisely, we will offer a brief overview of the history of the Greek language with special emphasis on the Greek vocabulary that Greek language landed or borrowed at different stages of its history as a result of its linguistic contact with other nations and languages. We will start with the Pre-Hellenic phase of Greek and then we focus in Proto-Hellenic, Ancient Greek, Koine, Medieval Greek and finally Modern Greek.

2022-23 Winter

47900 Research Seminar

The course aims to guide students on their research in a structured way and to present professionalization information crucial to success in the field. The course is organized largely around working on the research paper, with the goal of making it a conference-presentable and journal-publishable work. Topics covered include abstracts, publishing, handouts, presentation skills, course design, creating and maintaining a CV, cover letters, webpages, and in general everything that is required for you to successfully compete for jobs in linguistics.

W 12:00 – 1:50 pm

2022-23 Winter

48000 Pedagogy Workshop

This course deals with a variety of topics specific to Linguistic Pedagogy.

TH 3:30 – 4:50 pm

2022-23 Winter

60000 Reading and Research

This course is an independent study under the guidance of a faculty advisor, indicated by the section number. Please consult with the faculty member in question before enrolling.

Prerequisites

Departmental approval.

Staff
2022-23 Winter

20001 Introduction to Linguistics

This course offers a brief survey of how linguists analyze the structure and the use of language. Looking at the structure of language means understanding what phonemes, words, and sentences are, and how each language establishes principles for the combinations of these things and for their use; looking at the use of language means understanding the ways in which individuals and groups use language to declare their social identities and the ways in which languages can change over time. The overarching theme is understanding what varieties of language structure and use are found across the world's languages and cultures, and what limitations on this variety exist.

2022-23 Spring

20060 ASL Classifiers

This course will introduce students to the different types of basic classifiers used in American Sign Language as well as how to use them to express various concepts in ASL. The course will help students to develop and improve their conversational, receptive, and expressive skills in American Sign Language. Upon completion students will be able to grasp the rules of grammar for basic ASL classifiers as well as how to apply this knowledge in more sophisticated dialogues.

Prerequisites

ASLG 10400, Intermediate American Sign Language I.

2022-23 Spring

20101 Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology

This course is an introduction to the study of speech sounds and their patterning in the world's languages. The first half of the course focuses on how speech sounds are described with respect to their articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual structures. There are lab exercises both in phonetic transcription and in the acoustic analysis of speech sounds. The second half focuses on fundamental notions that have always been central to phonological analysis and that transcend differences between theoretical approaches: contrast, neutralization, natural classes, distinctive features, and basic phonological processes (e.g., assimilation).

2022-23 Spring

20202 Advanced Syntax

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Syntax (LING 20201).

Prerequisites

LING 20201, Intro to Syntax

2022-23 Spring

20301 Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics

This course familiarizes students with what it means to study meaning and use in natural language. By “meaning” we refer to the (for the most part, logical) content of words, constituents, and sentences (semantics), and by “use” we intend to capture how this content is implemented in discourse and what kinds of additional dimensions of meaning may then arise (pragmatics). Some of the core empirical phenomena that have to do with meaning are introduced: lexical (i.e., word) meaning, reference, quantification, logical inferencing, presupposition, implicature, context sensitivity, cross-linguistic variation, speech acts. Main course goals are not only to familiarize students with the basic topics in semantics and pragmatics but also to help them develop basic skills in semantic analysis and argumentation.

Prerequisites

LING 20001, Intro to Linguistics

2022-23 Spring

27010 Psycholinguistics

This is a survey course in the psychology of language. We will focus on issues related to language comprehension, language production, and language acquisition. The course will also train students on how to read primary literature and conduct original research studies.

2022-23 Spring

27050 Linguistic Perspectives on Language Disorders

TBA.

2022-23 Spring

29700 Reading and Research

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor and linguistics undergraduate adviser.

 

Staff
2022-23 Spring

30202 Syntactic Analysis II

This course is a continuation of Syntax I. The emphasis will be on A'-movement and ellipsis operations within the framework of Principles and Parameters and the Minimalist Program. Although we will examine different types of movement and ellipsis constructions, as well as their interactions, the objective will be to understand to what extent we can develop a general theory of syntax. The course will have a strong cross-linguistic aspect to it, examining data from Irish, Austronesian languages, Mayan languages, Wolof, Russian, Romance, Germanic, and others. The topics will include wh-movement in questions, relative clauses, and other constructions, islands and other constraints on movement, sentence fragments (sluicing, split questions), VP-ellipsis, and gapping.

Prerequisites

LING 30201, Syntactic Analysis I

2022-23 Spring

10300/30300 Elementary Modern Greek III

This course expands on the material presented in MOGK 10200/30200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Prerequisites

MOGK 10200/30200, Elementary Modern Greek II or consent of instructor.

2022-23 Spring

10300/30300 American Sign Language III

American Sign Language is the language of the deaf in the United States and much of Canada. It is a full-fledged autonomous language, unrelated to English or other spoken languages. This introductory course teaches the student basic vocabulary and grammatical structure, as well as aspects of deaf culture.

Prerequisites

ASLG 10200/30200, American Sign Language II.

2022-23 Spring

30302 Semantics and Pragmatics II

This is the second in a two-course sequence designed to provide a foundation in the scientific study of all aspects of linguistic meaning. The second quarter focuses on the syntax-semantics interface and cross-linguistic semantics. The class will introduce in detail a theory of the way in which the meaning of complex linguistic expressions is formed compositionally from the meaning of constituent parts, and the interaction of semantic and syntactic composition. This theory will form the basis for exploring some empirical questions about the systematicity of cross-linguistic variation in the encoding of meaning.

Prerequisites

LING 30301, Semantics and Pragmatics I

2022-23 Spring

10600/30600 Intermediate American Sign Language III

This is the third course in the Intermediate series. In this course we continue to increase grammatical structure, receptive and expressive skills, conversational skills, basic linguistic convergence, and knowledge of idioms. Field trip required.

Prerequisites

ASLG 10500, Intermediate American Sign Language II.

2022-23 Spring

21001/31001 Greece and the Balkans in the Age of Nationalism

Crosslistings
HIST 23613, NEHC 21002, REES 21001

This course is an introduction to the history of Southeastern Europe since the 1790s. Each week’s work will examine a key topic in Balkan affairs through a combination of lectures, readings, and discussion of associated issues. The course will not follow the history of any one Balkan country comprehensively. Instead, it will direct students’ attention to relevant developments that address questions like these: (1) How does Balkan history relate to European history? (2) What is a nation, a nationality, and an ethnic group? (3) What has nationalism meant in the Balkans? The course emphasizes the history of Greece, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, and Yugoslavia, with some attention to events in the Ottoman Empire, the Habsburg Monarchy, and Hungary as appropriate. The course aims to offer a historical background that will enable students to better understand the recent history of Greece and the Balkans.

2022-23 Spring

22550/32550 Speech Play and Verbal Art

Crosslistings
LACS 22550/32550

TBA.

2022-23 Spring

25400/35400 Swahili III

Swahili is the most popular language of Sub-Saharan Africa, spoken in most countries of Eastern and Central Africa by more than 50 million people. Swahili is characterized by the typical complex Bantu structure. However, it is particularly easy to pronounce and fast learned.


The Elementary Swahili series is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Swahili and a basic understanding of its structures. The course presents basic phonological, grammatical, and syntactic patterns of Kiswahili.


Through a variety of exercises, students develop communicative functionality in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis is put on dialogues and role-plays, individual and group presentations, and the use of audiovisual and web-based resources. Swahili culture and African culture in general are an important component of the course.


At the end of the elementary course series, the students are able to communicate efficiently in everyday life situations, write and present short descriptive notes about elementary pieces of verbal creation (documentaries and video series in Swahili). This course allows fulfilling the non-Indo-European language requirement.

Prerequisites

SWAH 25300, Swahili II or consent of instructor.

2022-23 Spring

26002/36002 Language in Society

This course is an introduction to sociolinguistics, the study of language in its social context. We will look at variation at all levels of language and how this variation constructs and is constructed by identity and culture, including relationships between language and social class, language and gender, and language and ethnicity. We will also discuss language attitudes and ideologies, as well as some of the educational, political, and social repercussions of language variation and standardization.

Prerequisites

LING 20001, Intro to Linguistics

2022-23 Spring

28356/38356 Linguistic Introduction to Swahili II

Based on Swahili Grammar and Workbook, this course is a continuation of Linguistic Introduction to Swahili I. It addresses complex issues related to grammatical agreement, verb moods, noun and verb derivation, non-typical adjectives and adverbs, double object constructions, subordinate / coordinated clause constructions, and dialectal variation. Additionally, this course provides important listening and expressive reading skills. For advanced students, historical interpretations are offered for exceptional patterns observed in Swahili, in relation with other Bantu languages. This course allows fulfilling the non-Indo-European language requirement.

Prerequisites

Prerequisites: Linguistic Introduction to Swahili I or instructor’s consent

2022-23 Spring

28380/38380 Introduction to Kinyarwanda I

Spoken by around 18 million in Central and Eastern Africa, Kinyarwanda / Kirundi is one of the most spoken Bantu languages and has the status of an official language in Rwanda and Burundi. Based on a conversation book and a grammar guide, this course integrates speaking practice and linguistic discussion. It will allow the students to understand fundamental structures of Kinyarwanda in various areas. Topics include sound and tonal patterns, noun class agreements, verb moods, and sentence structures. Additionally, this course provides important listening and expressive reading skills. It will allow the students to discover elements of the Rwandan culture and to participate in elementary conversation about everyday life in Kinyarwanda. This is a general introduction course with no specific prerequisites. It allows fulfilling the non-Indo-European language requirement.

2022-23 Spring

29404/39404 Multilingualism and Multilingual Education

Crosslistings
BASQ 29423/39423

This course focuses on current approaches to multilingualism and multilingual education from psycholinguistic, sociolinguistic, and educational perspectives. Topics to cover include multilingualism and minority languages, the effect of bilingualism on the acquisition of additional languages, definitions and typologies of multilingual education. The course includes different theoretical and research perspectives in the study of multilingual competence and evaluation of multilingual programs in education, such as translanguaging or the study of the linguistic landscape. The course pays specific attention to the analysis of different research methodologies and to the role of minority languages in education and in society.

Jasone Cenoz
2022-23 Spring

24400/44400 Lexical Functional Grammar

TBA.

2022-23 Spring

46100 Information Theoretic Models of Phonology

TBA.

2022-23 Spring

48000 Pedagogy Workshop

This course deals with a variety of topics specific to Linguistic Pedagogy.

2022-23 Spring

60000 Reading and Research

This course is an independent study under the guidance of a faculty advisor, indicated by the section number. Please consult with the faculty member in question before enrolling.

 

Prerequisites

Departmental approval.

Staff
2022-23 Spring