Diane Brentari

Faculty Photo
Mary K. Werkman Professor, Department of Linguistics; Co-Director, Center for Gesture, Sign, and Language
Pronouns: She/Her/Hers
Rosenwald 205D
Office Hours: By Appointment
(773) 702-5725
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1990
Teaching at UChicago since 2011
Research Interests: Sign Languages, Phonology, Morphology, Language Variation, Typology

Dr. Diane Brentari's broad interests address issues in sign language grammars, particularly problems at the intersection of morphology, phonology, and prosody. Her work has primarily focused on sign language phonology as a way to understand the effects of communication mode (or modality) on language, as well as the flexibility of the human language capacity in constructing spoken and signed languages.

Her current research involves language variation among sign languages, and how the mental lexicon emerges in historical time, which includes the relationship between gesture, homesign systems, and well-established sign languages. Dr. Brentari is one of three Directors of the Center for Gesture, Sign and Language and is the Director of the Sign Language Linguistics Lab.

Recent Publications

BOOKS:

  • Brentari, Diane. 2019. Sign language phonology. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Brentari, Diane, and Jackson Lee. 2018. Shaping Phonology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

ARTICLES:

  • Brentari, Diane, Rabia Ergin, Ann Senghas, Pyeong-Whan Cho, Eli Owens, and Marie Coppola. in press. Community interactions and phonemic inventories in emerging sign languages. Phonology.
  • Brown, Amanda, Wim Pouw, Diane Brentari, and Susan Goldin-Meadow. 2021. When hands are used to communicate they are less susceptible to illusion than when they are used to estimate. Psychological Science DOI: 10.1177/0956797621991552
  • Edwards, Terra, and D. Brentari. 2021. The grammatical incorporation of demonstratives in an emerging tactile language. Frontiers in Communication: Language Scienceshttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.579992/full
  • Iris Berent, Iris,  Outi Bat-El, Diane Brentari, Qatherine Andan, and Vared Vaknin-Nusbaum. 2021. Amodal phonology. Journal of Linguistics 57. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022226720000298 
  • Brentari, Diane., Laura Horton and Susan Goldin-Meadow. 20201 Crosslinguistic variation in the simultaneous morphology of sign language. The Linguistic Review. https://doi.org/10.1515/tlr-2020-2055
  • Edwards, Terra, and Diane Brentari. 2020. Feeling Phonology: The conventionalization of phonology in protactile communities in the United States. Language, 96(4), 819-840. doi.org/10.1353/lan.2020.0063

2019-2020 Course Offerings

Phonological Analysis I (LING 30101)  - Autumn 2019

This course introduces cross-linguistic phonological phenomena and methods of analysis through an in-depth examination of fundamental notions that transcend differences between theoretical approaches: contrast, neutralization, natural classes, distinctive features, and basic non-linear phonological processes (e.g., assimilation, harmony, dissimilation).

The American Deaf Community: Language, Culture and Society (LING 26030) - Winter 2020

This course will focus on the Deaf community that uses American Sign Language (ASL) as a lens into the disciplines of linguistics, psychology, and cultural studies, and how the use of ASL contributes to individual identity and identity within society.  In addition to these disciplinary foci, topics of Deaf literature and art forms will figure in the discussion and readings, which come from a variety of sources and include seminal works in the field from historical and contemporary perspectives.

2020-2021 Course Offerings

Seminar in Phonology & Morphology: Multiple Verb Predicates (LING 52410) - Autumn 2020

This course will address the wide range of multiple verb predicates across the world's languages. Readings will address the diagnostics for the category "serial verb" versus other types of multiple verb predicates in signed and spoken languages.

The American Deaf Community: Language, Culture and Society (LING 26030) - Winter 2021

This course will focus on the Deaf community that uses American Sign Language (ASL) as a lens into the disciplines of linguistics, psychology, and cultural studies, and how the use of ASL contributes to individual identity and identity within society.  In addition to these disciplinary foci, topics of Deaf literature and art forms will figure in the discussion and readings, which come from a variety of sources and include seminal works in the field from historical and contemporary perspectives.